UA-16648484-2
CLEAN THAT CATCH BASIN NOW!

gonna-come-a-floodhttps://fsjna.org/2012/05/free-protection/

Before you go to work today (or if you are just coming home) clean the storm drains around your block NOW! Big line of storms coming soon. Gonna come a flood!

More about storm drain cleaning in the links:
https://fsjna.org/2012/03/gonna-come-a-flood/

and

https://fsjna.org/2012/05/free-protection/
catch-basin-working-2013jan10
DO IT NOW | Big line of storms coming | Clean the storm drains near your home.
https://fsjna.org/2012/05/free-protection/

CITY REMINDS RESIDENTS OF SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING SEVERE WEATHER

Residents Should Call 911 to Report Street Flooding and NOLA311 to Report Malfunctioning Traffic Signals

NEW ORLEANS, LA—In anticipation of severe weather forecasted for the area, the City is reminding residents to monitor weather conditions and stay alert. According to the National Weather Service, heavy rain and storms will affect the area today. Rainfall of 2-4 inches along with wind is expected.

Residents should call the City’s 311 hot line for emergency preparedness information and to report malfunctioning traffic signals. Due to the potentially severe danger that could result from high water, residents should call 911 to report street flooding and life-threatening emergencies.

Residents are advised to stay at home during the severe weather unless an emergency makes it absolutely necessary for them to get on the road. The NOPD will ticket motorists who drive faster than 5 mph on streets with standing water.

The following is a list of streets prone to significant flooding during severe weather.

Calliope @ Claiborne towards Tchoupitoulas St
Calliope & Tchoupitoulas St On-ramps
I-10 and Tulane Exit towards Claiborne
Airline & Tulane Ave intersection
4400 Block of Washington
Washington Ave. near Xavier
All surrounding streets to St. Charles flooded, Gravier/Tulane/S Dupre, S Claiborne/Washington.
Claiborne/Orleans Ave.
S Carrollton/Palmetto
Magazine/St Mary
Broad/Louisiana Ave./S.Claiborne
Josephine/Prytania
Earhart/Jeff Davis-Carrollton
500 blk of Lake Marina
Canal Blvd/I-10/Navarre
Erato/S Genois/City Park/Carrollton
Washington Ave. near Xavier, Washington
Gravier/Tulane/S Dupre
S Claiborne/Washington
Simon Bolivar & Calliope coming from Loyola Ave under the overpass
Poland Ave from St Claude to N. Claiborne
S. Claiborne at Joseph
Holiday to the Crescent City Connection
Shirley and DeGaulle
DeGaulle under the Westbank Expressway
General Meyer from Pace to Shirley
Richland and General Meyer
MacArthur and Holiday
Tullis
Garden Oaks
Chelsea
Vespasian and Wall
The City’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness is monitoring the severe weather and will keep residents updated through e-mail alert and the Twitter handle @nolaready.

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“Thought you would like to know that our front yard did beautifully yesterday!” This message brought to you by the owners of the Broadmoor house that used to get 8″ in their front yard after a hard rain who participated in the #FrontYardInitiative.

The driveway on the left and bioswale on the right now capture and slow water from entering the city’s system. Photo below shows what used to happen after a one-hour 2″ rain (Broadmoor got 5.49″ in a matter of hours on Aug 5.) Evans + Lighter Landscape Architecture Quality Sitework Materials Truegrid Water Collaborative of Greater New Orleans. Details about the program in the link:
http://www.urbanconservancy.org/project/fyi/

The Front Yard Initiative is the Urban Conservancy’s response to excessive yard paving. Rampant front yard paving is a community issue that has broad and significant effects on the city of New Orleans from stormwater to safety.

Stormwater management in New Orleans has been characterized by regularly overwhelmed drainage systems, excessive paving and pumping that has depleted groundwater levels and led to a sinking city, and urban water assets being wasted while hidden behind walls, underground, or pumped into the river and lake. All of these issues and the failure of traditional infrastructure (levees, pipes and pumps) to protect the city from Hurricane Katrina, continuous flooding, and subsidence has led to a shift in mindset regarding the most effective and thoughtful way to manage stormwater in South Louisiana. It is clear that the single-minded approach of rushing stromwater over pavement, into pipes and pumping it out of the city needs to be reevaluated.

About the author
Charlie London
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www.FSJNA.org is a community service of Charlie London. Charlie London is the Content Strategist for Faubourg St. John. Click on the icons above this text for more. Even more information is available at http://katrinafilm.com Links to the original article (when applicable) are provided in the post.